18 August 2013

US-Israel Stratetic Partnership is 2427 Years Old

If it is already obvious to you that the American-Israeli special relationship is at least 24 centuries old and that it will last forever more, then there is no need to read further.  If, on the other hand, you could benefit from a simple explanation of just how far back the connection between our two people really is, then read on.  The proof of the pudding is in my back yard.

Here is a photograph I took this morning in my north American garden:


Yep, you guessed it.  American Finch.  This time of the year it visits rather often - it's rather partial to my sunflower seeds. 

Here is a picture of the good old Hoopoe, the national bird of Israel.  As usual, it comes with the Star of David in the background.

Need I say more?  Oh, I do... Okay.  As you will be aware, in 414 BC Aristophanes wrote a play called "Birds".  Both Hoopoe and Finch feature prominently in Aristophane's play; what's more they are close allies throughout the performance.

And their you have it.   Hoopoe, which is the Israeli national bird, and AMERICAN finch, were allies going all the way back to the fifth century BC. 

If you like this proof of just how ancient the US-Israeli partnership really is, you will no doubt appreciate the logic of Israeli archaeologists, who have just discovered the runes of King David's palace.  They know for a fact that it belonged to Kind David, because "Khirbet Qeiyafa is the best example exposed to date of a fortified city from the time of King David".  Proof of the pudding.

19 comments:

SnoopyTheGoon said...

And I would add that this partnership even back then had all the necessary fingertips of Bush family.

SnoopyTheGoon said...

According to Wikipedia:

The Hoopoes have well-developed anti-predator defences in the nest. The uropygial gland of the incubating and brooding female is quickly modified to produce a foul-smelling liquid, and the glands of nestlings do so as well. These secretions are rubbed into the plumage. The secretion, which smells like
rotting meat, is thought to help deter predators, as well as deter parasites and possibly act as an antibacterial agent. The secretions stop soon before the young leave the nest.
In addition to this secretion nestlings are able to direct streams of faeces at nest intruders from the age of six days, and will also hiss at intruders in a snake like fashion.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoopoe

Remind me not to investigate any Hoopoe nests.

SnoopyTheGoon said...

This is a good technique which the Jews should have learnt a long time ago.

SnoopyTheGoon said...

Oh, but you don't need Wiki for this: somewhere in the teaching of our religion some rabbi characterized Hoopoe as a smelly bird.

SnoopyTheGoon said...

True, but only a few centuries later another famous rabbi explained that the first rabbi didn't actually mean to call the bird smelly. It was all a hyperbole. How could you not know that?

SnoopyTheGoon said...

Apparently that second rabbi was devoid of sense of smell then. Happens to the best of us.

As for what I don't know: There is not enough disk space for the stuff I don't know yet. but I'm getting there ;-)

SnoopyTheGoon said...

So no wonder that the Indians in Blazzing Saddles were speaking Yiddish!

SnoopyTheGoon said...

My rabbi was bigger than yours :)

SnoopyTheGoon said...

Snoopy, it is an American *Gold*finch, not just a finch. Does that make it more Jewish, sort of like Goldberg or Goldstein?

SnoopyTheGoon said...

Exactly.

SnoopyTheGoon said...

Ah. Oh.

SnoopyTheGoon said...

As long as it is not a Finch-elstein, I don't mind its tribal roots.

SnoopyTheGoon said...

A very good point indeed. Not sure how I missed it... Thanks David.

SnoopyTheGoon said...

I guess I could stand to be more careful, too. But I did think that you are a bird-watcher, Snoopy.

SnoopyTheGoon said...

Although the reference to "this morning in my north American garden" should really have been a give away.

SnoopyTheGoon said...

No, David, I am an (pretty amateur) bird photographer. There is a huge gulf between photographers and watchers. They (the watchers) consider us to be a kind of lowlife usually.

SnoopyTheGoon said...

Yeah, even with a long reach of an Elder I am still not equipped by such garden.

SnoopyTheGoon said...

Actually Snoopy, as a bird-watcher I have always been in awe of anyone who can photograph birds well. It is hard enough just seeing them, let alone capturing the moment. In any case, keep up the good work.

SnoopyTheGoon said...

That's fine, I am not bitter about watchers' attitude ;-)